A promising drug shows results in reducing the effects of Alzheimer’s disease

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Alzheimer’s disease is currently the largest unmet medical need in neurology. More than 44 million people live with dementia worldwide, with Alzheimer’s being the most common form. As aging populations expand, it is critical that better treatments become available. George Clinical is currently managing a clinical trial in Australia of a new drug whose preliminary results show promise in preventing the disease’s progression and relieve symptoms.

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is commonly known as a form of dementia and potentially contributes to 60-70% of cases. The World Health Organisation (WHO) estimates that 47.5 million people currently have dementia, and 7.7 million new cases are announced every year[1]. Furthermore, there are over 332,000 Australians who are diagnosed with dementia, with the number expected to increase to 400,000 as the population ages[2].

A large global biopharmaceutical company have been trialling a drug that is able to potentially modify the outcome of this debilitating disease. This drug is considered to be four times more effective than the current standard of care drug for AD, donepezil. George Clinical (GC) is providing Project Management and Clinical Monitoring services for this compound’s trial.

The GC Project Manager works closely with the Principal Investigator of the study to ensure that the study runs smoothly. They oversaw all aspects of the study and across all functional areas, ensuring that communication was clear with all stakeholders while delivering high quality service in a timely fashion.

Conclusion

With the early results in, the future of this drug appears to be very encouraging, which has resulted it being labelled as a breakthrough for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. George Clinical is excited to be part of the clinical development of this innovative therapy that may significantly improve the outcome of people suffering from AD.

[1] http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs362/en/

[2] http://www.alz.org/au/dementia-alzheimers-australia.asp


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